10 Cancer Causing Toxins You Need to Avoid

10 Cancer Causing Toxins You Need to Avoid

Most people assume they and the environment around them are generally healthy. The sad reality is that we are living in a world filled with toxins. Events that have occurred over the last 50 years have dramatically increased the environmental pollutants in our air, water, and soil.

Every human being is now toxic to a certain extent and as the bucket theory supports, our toxicity load increases every day. Eventually the bucket will overflow and the number of symptoms and obstacles our body struggles to manage will result in disease − oftentimes cancer.

Partly to blame is the explosion of the manufacturing industry. There is an increase in metals and hazardous chemicals like there has never been before. The United States reported in 1998 that industries were manufacturing 9,000 various chemicals in the amount of 6.5 trillion pounds. Disregarding smaller companies, major American facilities alone reported dumping 7.1 billion pounds of waste. This waste, which ended up in our air, water, and soil consisted of 650 unique industrial pollutants.

Here are 10 of the most potent and hazardous chemicals in the environment you need to: 1) be aware of, and 2) avoid as much as possible through your lifestyle choices and purchasing decisions.

1. PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls):

The use of PCBs in industrial manufacturing has been banned for decades in the U.S. However, this organic chemical remains present in the environment and accumulates into our bodies.

Risks: Impaired fetal brain development and cancer.

Major Sources: One of the most concentrated food contaminants is farm raised salmon. PCBs from the environment are found in fish that are macerated and used as a food source for the salmon, causing bioaccumulation of the toxin.

Read the full article here.

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